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Entries for 'stress'

01

I wonder how many of us have the kind of job that puts us in contact with those we consider to be heroes on a daily basis. I have a job like that. I’m a college advisor and many of my heroes are the students who come in to see me for direction every day.

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reflection, stress, advising approaches, persistence, Tim Champarde
01

Is your job a source of stress in your life? Do you feel overworked and unappreciated? Do you feel irritable about minor things at work, or need a huge effort to complete the simplest tasks? Does it seem like you are always geared up, need to hurry up, catch up, or shut up? Are you fed up? If you answered yes to these questions, you could be the victim of too much stress.

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stress, Beatrice Logan, Annie Turman
01

How can a student reach this point in the program without meeting the basic admission requirements? If we permit students to begin taking education classes, where is the line drawn beyond which the student cannot enroll in additional courses without meeting admission requirements? Do we, as advisors and educators, have a responsibility to help students meet the admission requirements? What approaches have been utilized and how effective are these strategies?

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major choice, stress, teacher education, advising approaches, Lee Kem, advising strategy, career counseling
Posted in: 2004 June 27:2
01

Preparing students for a career is not higher education’s primary focus. However, the question is understandable. We expect an action to produce an outcome, a direction. “Undecided” insinuates unknowing, and unknowing suggests lack of direction. We stress the need for critical thinking, developing transferable skills, immersion in learning situations, and studying a topic in-depth, i.e., the importance of college for the intellectual experience itself. Nonetheless, the anxiety over what happens the Monday after graduation weighs heavily from day one for students (and their parents); thus it demands our attention.

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career advising, major choice, stress, advising strategy, encouraging students, Liberal Arts, advising skills, Andrew Colby, undeclared students
01
While some may consider college a refuge from the rest of the world, it is also a place where students struggle with finances, loss, career choices, unhealthy relationships, and a myriad of other concerns. Still others...cope with a diagnosed or undiagnosed mood disorder including depression, bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, dysthymia, or cyclothymia. The student with a mood disorder might visit an advisor for excessive absences, tardiness, repeatedly dropping courses, or poor academic standing. These students may believe they are failures, appear overly sensitive, pessimistic, dependent, irritable, or even hostile. Some have problems with concentration, motivation, indecisiveness, or being overly ambitious despite a lack of accomplishments. While none of these behaviors is proof of a mood disorder, it provides academic advisors with an opportunity to speak with students about support services available on their campus. In addition to giving guidance about a study skills class, time management workshops, or tutoring, advisors could inform students about college counseling services to increase their awareness. Sharkin, Plageman, & Coulter (2005) cited the importance of informing students about the benefits of counseling as a preventive measure before a crisis develops....Whether a student discloses a mood disorder or you suspect as much, advisors should know that relationships make a difference in the lives of students. As an advisor you are often the first contact for a student. The development of an encouraging relationship provides us with the opportunity to guide students to the most appropriate services, give support, and leave the door open to their future success.

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rapport, communication, build relationships, stress, encouraging students, disabilities, Jeffery Herman
Posted in: 2007 June 30:2
01
High achievers characteristically appear to know what they are doing and where they are going. But this is often far from the truth. Many honors students have been programmed and pushed from so many different directions that they hardly know what to study and what they really want to do with their lives....From my perspective, I see the work of advisors as helping these students break away from parental influence so they can find their own desires and professions. Advising high achievers is something like training a thoroughbred. Here are some suggestions I hope will be helpful.

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proactive advising, build relationships, high achieving, honors, stress, academic support, student motivation, advising strategy, advising approaches, parental involvement, encouraging students, Joan Digby
01

As more and more Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines return home from war, there is a greater need than ever for educational institutions to provide these students with resources and support. Academic advisors are in an ideal position to both advocate for this student group and to provide the support services these students need to transition to academia, persist through their programs, and reach their graduation goals.

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proactive advising, stress, academic support, at-risk students, cultural differences, advising strategy, distance, military, Nicole Lovald
01
It is not realistic to expect every academic advisor to know the particulars about the financial aid world. However, when it comes to dealing with students whose aid is jeopardized or lost because of previous academic performance, advisors at both public and private institutions should be able to discuss all of the ramifications so that students are able to make informed decisions about these potentially life-altering matters.

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role of advisor, stress, academic support, at-risk students, probation, financial aid, Andrea Harris, Chris Maroldo, advising skills, advising competencies, proactive advising
01
Advising is an awesome responsibility and privilege in today’s educational climate. To be a good role model, learn to reduce stress, exercise regularly, eat properly, and think positively. Advisors who have mens sana in corpore sano (a healthy mind in a healthy body) will live longer, feel better, and be more effective during their careers.

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stress, advising environment, Lee Kem, Joe DeBella, William Koenecke
01
The college experience plays a fundamental role in a student’s personal development. We believe that increased accessibility to pre-college, credit-bearing options indicates that the number of students who earn pre-college credits will continue to grow. This continued growth will challenge higher education institutions to find ways to meet the needs of these younger college students. The most successful students will be those whose college educations help them make intentional decisions about their classes, majors, and careers in conjunction with successful evolution through developmental stages.

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first year students, stress, academic support, student motivation, advising approaches, Danielle Tisinger, Julie Murphy
01

Just when advisors say, “I’ve finally seen it all!” an advising experience takes place that is so unusual, extraordinary, or just plain weird that it feels like an April Fool’s Day prank...expect the unexpected. In the world of academic advising, no two students and no two problems are exactly the same.

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rapport, empathy, communication, build relationships, stress, advising approaches, Heidi Koring, critical thinkin
Posted in: 2008 June 31:2
01

A good advisor is essential when “real life” gets in the way. In graduate school, it is very possible for students to fall through the cracks....Graduate school can be tough. The biggest challenge is finishing.... Discipline and working with others can help graduate students see the light at the end of the tunnel. It can be done. Parents, professors, and society encourage education, yet at the highest echelons of education, some students may find that there is not enough support. Advisors can help students strategize and find the inner strength and the discipline needed to complete what they began.

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decision-making, role of advisor, stress, at-risk students, preparedness, academic support, Kelli Moore
Posted in: 2008 June 31:2
01
The transition from student to professional involves a socialization process that can be extremely stressful for students in programs like nursing. Counseling students in the pre-program phase using a strategy such as anticipatory guidance can help prepare students for expected stressors and provide them with needed time to develop healthy coping strategies before entering their major.

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nursing students, stress, pre-health, advising strategy, Cheryl Bosley, Susanne Miller, Amy Novak
01
In order to assist with the nursing shortage, it is critical that educators focus on developing strategies for academic success and retention for students who are enrolled in undergraduate nursing programs (Jeffreys, 2007)...

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intrusive advising, proactive advising, nursing students, stress, pre-health, academic support, Jacqueline Klein
26
As I reflected on a favorite collection of stories that features an array of heartwarming characters who set off on grand adventures, I started thinking about some of their famous quotes and how they could be applied to academic advising and student success.

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stress, student motivation, Amanda Baldridge, encouraging students, decision-making
11
Today, as budgets continue to shrink and expectations continue to rise, we face our own crisis in higher education.  Many advisors are being asked to do more with less: more advisees, more meetings, more technology, more nights and weekends, more data, more assessment, fewer resources, less time.  This kind of environment has the potential to become toxic, leading to a culture of fear, competition, segregation, and blame.  Permaculture offers us insights as to how we can respond to these challenging times in a positive, productive way.

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stress, community relationships, advising environment, Nancy Willow
26

Students who do not meet minimum grade point average (GPA) requirements are generally placed on an academic warning or probationary status that is often universally applied to all students and administrated by faculty or advisors.  However, each students’ reasons for missing this academic mark are unique.  Regular connection with an advisor can be very impactful and meaningful to students because they are able to articulate their obstacles to someone in an open dialogue.

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communication, stress, academic support, at-risk students, dismissal, probation, financial aid, conflict resolution, referrals, Maureen McCoy
Posted in: 2018 March 41:1
27

Over time, academic advisors may begin to experience emotional, physical, and spiritual exhaustion from constantly witnessing and absorbing the difficulties of students. Developing self-care strategies within advising training and development can help advisors pay attention to their emotional state and allow time for reflection and healing.

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empathy, communication, advisor competencies, role of advisor, stress, academic support, advising strategy, assessment, active listening, Shantalea Johns, Mevash Ali
27

The author reflects on what she has learned during a decade as an academic advising supervisor.

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professional development, communication, build relationships, reflection, stress, professionalism, advising environment, Julee Braithwaite
Posted in: 2019 March 42:1
17

Occasionally, students enter their advising session with personal baggage to share with their advisor that detours the conversation away from the normal advising issues.  Knowledge of psychological first aid (PFA) give advisors tools to support students who are striving to overcome a traumatically challenging situation before making a referral to another support resource on or off campus.

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empathy, communication, build relationships, advisor training, stress, academic support, at-risk students, encouraging students, active listening, death, grieving, dealing with death, student loss, Cindy Firestein
Posted in: 2019 June 42:2
28

Research suggests that mental health and academic performance are positively correlated. Advisors are not expected to provide mental health counseling to students, but they would be remiss to ignore the impact of psychological issues and mental health on students’ experience, performance, and success. While treating students for mental health concerns may be beyond advisors’ scope, there are some ways in which they can address the issues.

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decision-making, retention, empathy, communication, build relationships, role of advisor, stress, academic support, advising theory, student motivation, persistence, Angelia Lomax
28

When academic advisors collaborate with institutional research professionals on their campuses for such an endeavor, it is important to move beyond the data which is readily available to institutional researchers to find sufficient data points for academic advisors to determine where to focus their student mentoring efforts.

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proactive advising, research, retention, stress, academic support, at-risk students, probation, encouraging students, persistence, advising research, Meg Wright Sidle, Megan Childress
28

With the student at the center of The University of Texas at Tyler’s efforts, Persistence and Retention Teams have been implemented to streamline employee communication to diminish the silo effect and find resolutions to student issues as efficiently as possible.

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proactive advising, research, retention, stress, academic support, at-risk students, probation, technology, encouraging students, persistence, advising research, Douglas Vardeman

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